Queries respecting the introduction, progress and abolition of slavery in Massachusetts.
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Queries respecting the introduction, progress and abolition of slavery in Massachusetts.

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Published by Printed by Joseph Belknap in [Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Slavery -- Massachusetts.,
  • Broadsides.

Book details:

Edition Notes

SeriesEarly American imprints -- no. 28257.
ContributionsTucker, St. George, 1752-1827.
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination1 sheet ([1] p.)
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15453453M

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--The doctrine of prize in Negroes --Progress of public opinion on slavery in Massachusetts during the Revolution --The Constitution of --Abolition of the slave-trade. Responsibility: by George H. Moore, librarian of the New-York Historical Society and corresponding member of the Massachusetts . Abolition of the SlaveTrade Legislation. Appendix. Other editions - View all. Notes on the History of Slavery in Massachusetts George Henry Moore Full view - Notes on the History of Slavery in Massachusetts George Henry Moore Full view - that the laws of the province respecting an evil existing. He also compiled information on the history of slavery in Massachusetts, published as Queries Respecting the Introduction, Progress and Abolition of Slavery in Massachusetts by the Historical Society in A New Biography of Phillis Wheatley.   Slavery was legal in much of the United States until ratification of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution on Dec. 6, Most of the black slaves were then located in the states of the Southern Confederacy, and were agricultural workers. However, Massachusetts had technically ended slavery many years earlier.

On Jan. 6, , an African-American slave named Felix delivered a written request to the Massachusetts General Court. In it, he asked to end slavery. Felix’s petition reflected the talk circulating in Boston just before the American Revolution. Talk of freedom and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Little is known of Felix, but his [ ].   WMQ 17 (): ; Robert M. Spector, “The Quock Walker Cases: Slavery, Its Abolition, and Negro Citizenship in Early Massachusetts,” Journal of Negro History 53 (): EMANCIPATION in MASSACHUSETTS The Massachusetts Legislature in tabled a proposal for gradual emancipation. The draft constitution legally recognized slavery and banned free blacks from voting. It was rejected at the polls, for other reasons. Queries respecting the Introduction, Progress, and Abolition of Slavery in Massachusetts. 1st. The first introduction of negroes or other slaves in Massachusetts? 2d. Whether the African trade was carried on thither? at what period it commenced? to what extent it was carried on? when it began to decline? and when it was wholly discontinued? 3d.

In January of , St. George Tucker, a Virginia judge, wrote to the founder of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston clergyman and scholar Jeremy Belknap. This letter included a set of eleven queries regarding the history of slavery in Massachusetts. An abolitionist, Tucker was interested in the advent and eventual abolition of slavery in New England (and Massachusetts in particular), hoping . Abolition of Slavery in Massachusetts. Flag of Massachusetts. is the th anniversary of the Declaration of Rights, which is regarded as abolishing slavery in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.. In the legislature of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts — the General Court — enacted the Declaration of Rights to the Constitution of the Commonwealth.   Return to Top of Page. Chapter: “Activity of the Abolitionists. - Action of Northern Legislatures,” by Henry Wilson, in History of the Rise and Fall of the Slave Power in America, During the years of - 35 the operations of the New England Antislavery Society, which had, owing to the formation of the American Society, taken the name and become the Massachusetts Antislavery. Second Speech of Mr. Rantoul, of Massachusetts, on the Coalition in Massachusetts, Delivered in the House of Representatives of the United States, March 9, , in Reply to Hon. George T. Davis. Washington: Congressional Globe.